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Experimental assessment of techniques for spatial registration between landmark trajectories and bone models

by abandieri last modified 2007-11-13 16:48

This paper, which is based on LHDL activities about the special gait analysis session, was presented at the last National Congress of SIAMOC

Cuneo, Italy, October 24th-27th. At the VIII National Congress of SIAMOC - the Italian Society of Clinical Movement Analysis - Prof. ALberto Leardini, from the Movement Analysis Laboratory c/o Istituti Ortopedici Rizzoli,  presented the following paper: Experimental assessment of techniques for spatial regisration between landmark trajectories and bone models written together with Laboratorio di Tecnologia Medica also c/o Istituti Ortopedici Rizzoli, and Universitè Libre de Bruxelles.

This work is based on the activities about the special gait analysis session, which were perfomed at the beginnig of the second year of life of the EU funded project (#026932) LHDL: Living Human Digital Library: Interactive digital library services to access collections of complex biomedical data on the musculo-skeletal apparatus which the paper authors'affiliations are consortium partners.

 

Introduction (extracted from the submitted abstract)

Graphical representation of musculo-skeletal motion from gait analysis data is becoming important and accessible in several clinical contexts [1]. For this to be realistic, reliable gait data, appropriate bone models, and suitable techniques for spatial registration must be available. Current techniques are based on straight spatial matching between template bone models and external spherical marker trajectories, mostly in combination with strong joint constraints to contrast the expected critical effect of soft tissue motion. These result both in false segmental reconstructions and unphysiological joint motion. A most realistic representation would involve a larger number of anatomical landmarks, a more careful identification and reconstruction of these in space, and suitable bone models. In the present study several different techniques for spatial registration were compared in a gold standard case, i.e. where bone models are very similar to those of the subject under gait analysis.